I’ve begun work on a new project on childless queens and I did two things to get myself ready to write: I re-read some older works and scanned Google Scholar to make sure I had the most up-to-date bibliography.

I re-read John Carmi Parsons works on motherhood as a fundamental element of queenship. Some of these works are now almost two decades old and I am struck by how much this has influenced so much of the work on queens. I agree, for the most part, that motherhood was important, but the prevalence of childless queens has made me wonder if it’s time for a re-appraisal of our emphasis on maternity. A year ago at Leeds, Kristen Geaman made a cogent case for a wider definition of motherhood to include not only queens as biological mothers but also as nurturing aunts and godmothers and as figural mothers for the realm who interceded on behalf of their subjects.

This is good food for thought, for now, and I welcome your thoughts and ideas on aspects of motherhood.

As for the bibliography, I spent the last few days poring over some notes from the excellent 2004 Budapest conference on queens (“Medieval and Early Modern Queens and Queenship: Questions of Income and Patronage”) and thought I’d check to see what the participants have been up to. Well, in a word, plenty. Here are some new items I’ve added to the bibliography tabs in this blog.

Adamska, Anna, “Latin and Vernacular – Reading and Meditation: Two Polish Queens and Their Books,” in Sabrina Corbellini (ed.), Cultures of Religious Reading in the Late Middle Ages (Turnhout Brepols Publishers, 2013), pp. 219–46.

Borkowska, Urszula, “The Funeral Ceremonies of the Polish Kings from the Fourteenth to the Eighteenth Centuries,” The Journal of Ecclesiastical History 36 (1985), pp 513–34.

———, “Theatrum Ceremoniale at the Polish Court as a System of Social and Political Communication,” in Anna Adamska and Marco Mostert (eds), The Development of Literate Mentalities in East Central Europe (Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2004), pp. 431–50.

Cengel, Lauren, “Partners in Rule: A Study of Twelfth-Century Queens of England,” doctoral dissertation, Wittenberg University Honors Theses, 2012.

Clements, Jill Hamilton, “The Construction of Queenship in the Illustrated Estoire de Seint Aedward le Rei,” Gesta 52:1 (2013), pp. 21–42.

Evans, Sandy, “Pays Gaste and Pucelle Gaste: Gendering Resistance in Garin le Loherenc, Gerbert de Mez, and Raoul de Cambrai,” Exemplaria 23:4 (2011), pp. 317–41.

Fößel, Amalie, “Gender and Rulership in the Medieval German Empire,” History Compass 7 (2009), pp. 55–65.

———, “The Queen’s Wealth in the Middle Ages,” Majestas 13 (2005), pp. 23–45.

Garcia de la Puente, Ines, “Gleb of Minsk’s Widow: Neglected Evidence on the Rule of a Woman in Rus’ian History?” Russian History 39:3 (2012). pp. 347–78.

Hicks, Michael A., Anne Neville (London: Faber & Faber, 2011).

Huneycutt, Lois, “‘Proclaiming her dignity abroad’: The Literary and Artistic Network of Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England, 1100–1118,” in June Hall McCash (ed.), The Cultural Patronage of Medieval Women (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1996), pp. 155–74.

Karaskova, Olga, “’Ung dressoir de cinq degrez’: Mary of Burgundy and the Construction of the Image of the Female Ruler,” in Juliana Dresvina and Nicholas Sparks (eds), Authority and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles: Papers delivered at the Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars, 2012), pp. 318–43.

Keene, Katie, “‘Cherchez Eufeme’: The Evil Queen in ‘Le Roman de Silence,’” Arthuriana 14:3 (2004), pp. 3–22.

———, “Margaret of Scotland: The Biography of an Eleventh-century Queen and Saint,” doctoral dissertation, Southern Methodist University, 2006.

Lambert, Sarah, “Images of Queen Melisande,” in Juliana Dresvina and Nicholas Sparks (eds), Authority and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles: Papers delivered at the Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars, 2012), 140–65.

Laynesmith, J. L., “Constructing Queenship at Coventry: Pageantry and Politics at Margaret of Anjou’s ‘Secret Harbour,’” in The Fifteenth Century III. Authority and Subversion (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2003), pp. 137–48.

———, “Fertility Rite or Authority Ritual? The Queen’s Coronation in England 1445–87,” Social Attitudes and Political Structures in the Fifteenth Century (Stroud: Sutton, 2000).

———, “Joan of Kent’s Tale: Adultery and Rape in the Age of Chivalry,” Medieval Life 5 (1996).

———, “The Kings’ Mother,” History Today 56:3 (2006), pp. 38–44.

———, “A Paper Crown: The Titles and Seals of Cecily Duchess of York,” The Ricardian 10:133 (1996).

———, “Telling Tales of Adulterous Queens in Medieval England: from Olympias of Macedonia to Elizabeth Woodville,” in Lynette Mitchell (ed.), Every Inch a King: Comparative Studies in Kings and Kingship in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds (Leiden: Brill, 2012).

———, “The Thistle & the Rose,” History Scotland 3 (2003).

Loconte, Aislinn, “‪Constructing Female Sanctity in Late Medieval Naples: The Funerary Monument of Queen Sancia of Majorca,” in Elizabeth L’Estrange, ‪Alison More (eds), Representing Medieval Genders and Sexualities in Europe: ‪Construction, Transformation, and Subversion, 600–1530 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2011), pp. 107–26.

Mielke, Christopher., “No Country for Old Women: Burial Practices and Patterns of Hungarian Queens of Árpád Dynasty (975–1301), doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, 2010.

Mikó, Árpád, “A Queen in Buda,” The Hungarian Quarterly 181 (2006), pp. 134–43.

Preston-Matto, Lahney, “Queens as Political Hostages in Pre-Norman Ireland: Derbforgaill and the Three Gormlaiths,” JEGP, Journal of English and Germanic Philology 109:2 (2010), pp. 141–61.

Saghy, Marianne, “Women and Power in Medieval East Central Europe,” East Central Europe 1:21–23 (1991–1993), pp. 219–25.

Slater, Laura, “Queen Isabella of France and the Politics of the Taymouth Hours,” Viator 43:2 (2012), pp. 209–45.

Slitt, Rebecca, “The Boundaries of Women’s Power: Gender and the Discourse of Political Friendship in Twelfth-Century England,” Gender & History (2012), 24: 1–17.

Turel, Noa, “Staging the Court: Auto-Iconicity and Female Authority around a 1478 Burgundian Baptism,” in Juliana Dresvina and Nicholas Sparks (eds), Authority and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles: Papers delivered at the Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars, 2012), pp. 344–75.

Turner, Ralph, “Eleanor of Aquitaine, Twelfth-Century English Chroniclers and her ‘Black Legend’,” Nottingham Medieval Studies 52 (2008), pp. 17–42.

Tyler, Elizabeth M., “Crossing Conquests: Polyglot Royal Women and Literary Culture in Eleventh-Century England,” in Elizabeth M. Tyler (ed.), Conceptualizing Multilingualism in England, c.800-c.1250 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011), pp. 171–96.

Verbanaz, Nina K., Portrayals of Women in Violent Situations in Texts of the High Middle Ages,” doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri-Columbia, 2008.

Wilkinson, Louise, “The Rules of Robert Grosseteste Reconsidered: The Lady as Estate and Household Manager in Thirteenth-Century England,” in Cordelia Beattie, Anna Maslakovic and Sarah Rees Jones (eds), The Medieval Household in Christian Europe, c. 850–1550 (Turnhout: Brepols Publisher, 2003), pp. 293–306.

Woodacre, Elena, “Questionable Authority: Female Sovereigns and their Consorts in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles,” in Juliana Dresvina and Nicholas Sparks (eds), Authority and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles: Papers delivered at the Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars, 2012), pp. 376–406.

As you can see, one citation lead to another and there are scholars on this list who we’re at Budapest but whose work was inspired by our colleagues who were. I’ve been remiss in including work from eastern Europe, which makes me think that there are so many more essays and books to include.

So, I finish with a request. As you browse through the bibliography, please make a note of omissions and send me an email or post a comment with the citations. My goal with this blog is to make a comprehensive bibliography available to a wide audience, and I very much appreciate you help.

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